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August 08 2017

holywritingpromptsbatbruh:

romy7:

anarcho-shindouism:

it’s dangerous to go alone. take this

thanks

@sylphofthedamned

angered-tanks:

thelegendofkungjew:

roboticbat:

ok hear me out

playing a healer is not actually bottoming for gamers, it’s definitely topping or at the very least power bottoming. You decide who lives and dies

playing tank on the other hand, that’s bottoming. you take hits for everyone else and beg healers for heals

ooooh daddy i’m squishy for healies

you are excommunicated from the brotherhood of tanks

August 07 2017

Rich SF residents get a shock: Someone bought their street

violent-darts:

violent-darts:

star-anise:

techno-gal:

ghostcongregation:

something to put a little pep in your step

Tldr: rich ppl allowed to be jerks to other rich ppl bc some rich ppl didn’t want to pay $14 tax bill

Which is kinda fun because usually only poor people get fucked over like this.

No guys that tl;dr misses the best part: why they are able to do this. 

They are able to do this because this is a private street. They are able to do this because of the ORIGINAL JACKASSERY of previous rich people who wanted to be able to literally bar all people Not Cool Enough from even being on their street (something you cannot do if it’s a public street). 

ALSO THE SECOND BEST PART: 

There’s a bit of irony in the couple’s purchase. Until a 1948 U.S. Supreme Court ruling banning the enforcement of racial covenants, homes in Presidio Terrace could be purchased only by whites.

“The more we dug into this,” said the Taiwan-born Cheng, “the more interesting it got.”

wethinkwedream:

wethinkwedream:

ok universe, i’m ready to feel good things. make me feel good things.

whenever i post this it works 
reblog if u want to feel good things & the universe will bring u something sweet 

rasec-wizzlbang:

afloweroutofstone:

westfailia:

beginning to get the impression anti-sjws have never actually caught an sjw acting like they think sjws act and only ever mistaken anti-sjws making fun of sjws for the real deal because it’s how they think they act

Four-dimensional Ouroboros

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thespectacularspider-girl:

klubbhead:

Fucking nuked from orbit

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holisthicc:

this is the content i signed up for

For inspiration reasons, here’s a list of actresses over 40 who can probably still kick our asses:

captcreate:

happilyshanghaied:

Kelly Hu (Age: 48)

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Linda Hamilton (Age: 60)

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Charlize Theron (Age: 41)

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Gina Torres ( Age: 47)

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Ming-Na Wen (Age: 52)

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Kate Beckinsale (Age: 43)

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Gwyneth Paltrow (Age: 44)

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Milla Jovovich (Age: 41)

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Jada Pinkett Smith (Age: 45)

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Michelle Yeoh (Age: 54)

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Lucy Lawless (Age: 48)

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Regina King (Age: 45)

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Lucy Liu (Age: 47)

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Helen Mirren (Age: 71)

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This is hot.

swarnpert:

male country artists: i love my truck and my beers

female country artists: i am going to kill my husband

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hobbitsaarebas:

this is some fuckin Nazgul Couture here

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twitterlols:

@nick-avallone she’s french

ǝuoʎɹǝʌǝ ʎɹɹos ʇɐq ɐ ʎןןɐnʇɔɐ ɯɐ ı

naamahdarling:

Hey. Hey. Hey. Hey. Hey. Hey.

Tell me a ridiculous, loveable fact about your OCs!

Bobby Miller drinks milk straight from the jug. He has to keep two jugs of milk, his and one for everyone else.

Clyde Sigan once developed super powers because he is actually worse than a toddler about putting things in his mouth.

Katrina McCormick loves being a telepath, especially at the airport. Even people who will be angry with each other within five minutes of leaving are, for a brief moment, so happy to see each other.

August 06 2017

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kineticpenguin:

Something strikes me as a bit off about this store display.

Wait…

No

NO!!!!

urfvgrl:

myliminalspaces:

fullten:

sylveon-rosepetal:

fullten:

I look after friends, and friend of friends kids a lot, and the personalities molded by the people around them is so… obvious. Kids who have parents who allow them to be themselves are, confident, out going, happy to talk about things they like, have no issue telling you “yes I’m happy with this” “no I’m bored”

But the kids whose parents/authority figures don’t support them? Scared to tell you what they like because they don’t want to be made fun of. Quiet, scared to form an opinion, if they don’t like something they just suffer through it because they don’t see their happiness as something important, as something anyone cares about.

And a lot of parents prefer it? They would rather have a quiet kid than a happy one. It’s so disgusting. Don’t even fucking have kids then. Get a pet rock, you’ll have more in common.

And a lot of parents who have kids who are afraid to form or express their opinions and emotions often tell their kids it’s ok for them to express how they feel, but the moment they do they’re guilt tripped, mocked, told their problems aren’t valid/important/a big deal, they tell other people without their kid’s permission, made fun of/told they’re childish, etc.

There’s a lot of that. Parents who want to know what their kids are thinking and feeling only to make the child more vulnerable to abuse, manipulation, humiliation.

There’s so many people who should never have children.

Sometimes my kids are on my last fucking nerve and I have to remind myself, “I WANT them to tell me if something is or isn’t okay, even if it’s the 500th time today that something small and random was upsetting - maybe they’re having a crappy day, and me telling them to knock it off wouldn’t help at all”.

^^^^^^

Deuce and I have managed to raise a VERY self-aware, emotionally developed child.

Which means ALL DAMN DAY LONG, I’m hearing, “Mom, I’m so sad and mad and frustrated!!!!!!!!” or “I don’t like that, you’re making me feel upset!” Alllllllllll day.

“Yes, kiddo – I get that it’s frustrating that your Lego keeps falling apart but… y'know, Lego be like that sometimes. Maybe you gotta try a different way or try to figure out why that piece doesn’t fit.”

“Yeah, I KNOW it’s upsetting to be disciplined but you just threw your food across the room and that’s not acceptable. I AM NOT happy with you right now and you WILL receive a consequence for that action. I’m sorry that makes you upset but… y'know, consequences be like that sometimes. Next time, let’s try to remember a better way to react so that we can both feel happy instead of upset.”

It is exhausting. So many times, I’d much rather just say, “Enough! Just be quiet. Figure it out. Don’t make things worse.”

But he needs to know he’s safe to talk to me about things that don’t feel right/good. He needs to know it’s important to me that he is happy and comfortable. And, most importantly, he needs to learn how to acknowledge these feelings (oh boy! has he got the hang of that!) and healthy ways to deal with and work through them.

I am not a fan of the emotional outbursts at all. Sometimes I worry that I’m too impatient with them. But I’m lucky that I have a kid who can say what he feels, calm down, then find a solution in under 30 seconds every time he has an outburst. I hope, as he grows older and is less impulsive, the outburst portion will dissipate altogether.

I will NEVER make him feel bad or guilty or stupid or like a burden for any feeling he expresses to me.

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rainy-days-are-over:

when the moon hits your eye like a big pizza pie
thats amore

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criticalzarya:

manbunjon:

thechanelmuse:

If this ain’t the most vilest, disturbing shit… 

The excerpt is from “Humanitarian” Angelina Jolie’s Vanity Fair cover story, in which she talks about her latest film project — First They Killed My Father, a movie adaptation of activist Loung Ung’s memoir about surviving the Cambodian genocide.

This Vanity Fair article was false and has been debunked by The Huffington Post. Here is an excerpt from their article on the matter:

“The actress faced critics after the magazine said her directors gave Cambodian children money, then took it away.

The Vanity Fair cover story, published online this week, described a “game” Jolie’s casting directors played with children from “orphanages, circuses and slum schools” while searching for an actor to play the role of Loung Ung, the author of the memoir on which the is film based.

In the game, as described by Vanity Fair contributor Evgenia Peretz, casting directors placed money in front of the children, asked them what they needed the money for, then took it away to elicit a reaction.
Critics called the casting strategy described in the magazine emotionally abusive and cruel.

Jolie said in a statement Saturday that the audition scene had been taken out of context. According to the actress, there were parents, guardians and non-governmental organization partners, as well as medical doctors, present throughout the entire filmmaking process, including auditions. She emphasized that no one was hurt by participating in the recreation of the film’s scenes.

“Every measure was taken to ensure the safety, comfort and well-being of the children on the film starting from the auditions through production to the present,” she told HuffPost in a statement.
Jolie, who directed the film, said the audition “game” described in the profile was an improvisation exercise based off a scene in the film. She also said real money was not taken from children during the auditions.

“I am upset that a pretend exercise in an improvisation, from an actual scene in the film, has been written about as if it was a real scenario,” said Jolie, a United Nations special envoy for refugees. “The suggestion that real money was taken from a child during an audition is false and upsetting. I would be outraged myself if this had happened.”

A source familiar with the film’s casting process told HuffPost the children who auditioned were aware they were improvising a scene from the film, adding that no real money was involved. Casting directors reiterated to the kids auditioning that it was a “pretend game” in order to ensure the actors did not feel any pressure, the source said.

The “pretend game” was reportedly based on Ung’s real-life experience of getting caught stealing by the Khmer Rouge. Ung, a Cambodian-American, survived the Khmer Rouge killings that claimed the lives of her parents, two siblings and nearly 2 million Cambodians in the late 1970s.

The actors who were ultimately cast in Jolie’s film are a mix of trained actors, orphans and disadvantaged children. Srey Moch Sareum, the child playing the film’s leading role, lives in a slum community and attends a non-governmental organization school in Cambodia.

“Srey Moch was the only child that stared at the money for a very, very long time,” Jolie had told Vanity Fair. “When she was forced to give it back, she became overwhelmed with emotion. All these different things came flooding back.”

Rithy Panh, a Cambodian filmmaker and producer on the film, said, ahead of the auditions, crews introduced the children to the camera equipment and explained they had to pretend to steal something that was left unattended and then get caught.
Panh, himself a survivor of the Cambodian genocide, called the criticism over the “game” described in the profile a “misunderstanding.”

“Great care was taken with the children not only during auditions, but throughout the entirety of the film’s making,” he said in a statement to HuffPost.
“Because the memories of the genocide are so raw, and many Cambodians still have difficulty speaking about their experiences, a team of doctors and therapists worked with us on set every day so that anyone from the cast or crew who wanted to talk could do so,” he added.

Jolie’s upcoming Netflix film is based on Ung’s 2000 memoir of the same name. Jolie said in the Vanity Fair profile that there was an “authentic connection to pain for everyone involved” with the film, which will be released later this year. She also explained that a therapist was on set every day to provide support for those impacted by flashbacks and nightmares of the Khmer Rouge’s rule.

Vanity Fair did not respond to HuffPost’s request for comment by the time of this publication.”

A statement from Angelina Jolie:

“I am upset that a pretend exercise in an improvisation, from an actual scene in the film, has been written about as if it was a real scenario. The suggestion that real money was taken from a child during an audition is false and upsetting. I would be outraged myself if this had happened.”

you all want her to be evil so bad

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